Corinth & Nemea

Corinth & Nemea

Things to do - general

Corinth  is a city and former municipality in Corinthia, Peloponnese, Greece. Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipalityCorinth, of which it is the seat and a municipal unit.[2] It is the capital of Corinthia.It was founded as Nea Korinthos or New Corinth (Νέα Κόρινθος) in 1858 after an earthquake destroyed the existing settlement of Corinth, which had developed in and around the site of ancient Corinth.Corinth derives its name from Ancient Corinth, a city-state of antiquity. In 1858, the old city, now known as Archaia Korinthos (Αρχαία Κόρινθος), located 3 km (1.9 mi) SW of the modern city, was totally destroyed by a magnitude 6.5 earthquake. Nea Korinthos or New Corinth was then built a few kilometers away on the coast of the Gulf of Corinth. A magnitude 6.3 earthquake in 1928 devastated the new city, which was then rebuilt on the same site.[3] It was rebuilt again after a great fire in 1933.

Nemea  is an ancient site in the northeastern part of the Peloponnese, in Greece. Formerly part of the territory of Cleonae in Argolis, it is today situated in the regional unit of Corinthia. The small village of Archaia Nemea (formerly known as “Koutsoumadi”[1] and then “Iraklion”) is immediately southwest of the archaeological site, while the new town of Nemea lies to the west.

Here in Greek mythology Heracles overcame the Nemean Lion of the Lady Hera, and here during Antiquity the Nemean Games were played, in three sequence, ending about 235 BCE, celebrated in the eleven Nemean odes of Pindar.In Greek mythology, Nemea was ruled by king Lycurgus and queen Eurydice. Nemea was famous in Greek myth as the home of the Nemean Lion, which was killed by the hero Heracles,[2] and as the place where the infant Opheltes, lying on a bed of parsley, was killed by a serpent while his nurse fetched water for the Seven on their way from Argos to Thebes. The Seven founded the Nemean Games in his memory, according to its aition, or founding myth, accounting for the crown of victory being made of parsley or the wild form of celery and for the black robes of the judges, interpreted as a sign of mourning. The Nemean Games were documented from 573 BC, or earlier, at the sanctuary of Zeus at Nemea.[3]

Half Day Corinth Canal & Wineries Of Nemea Tour

Half Day Corinth Canal & Wineries Of Nemea Tour

Corinth & Nemea
ATHENS We will start our tour with an early morning start from your Hotel, port, airport etc. Drivin More info